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Exam Implementing Cisco Enterprise Advanced Routing and Services (300-410 ENARSI)
Number 300-410
File Name Implementing Cisco Enterprise Advanced Routing and Services (300-410 ENARSI).vcepdf.300-410.2021-07-15.1e.76q.vcex
Size 2.84 Mb
Posted July 15, 2021
Downloads 9
Download Implementing Cisco Enterprise Advanced Routing and Services (300-410 ENARSI).vcepdf.300-410.2021-07-15.1e.76q.vcex

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Demo Questions

Question 1

Which configuration adds an IPv4 interface to an OSPFv3 process in OSPFv3 address family configuration?

  • A: Router# ospf3 1 address-family ipv4
  • B: Router(config-router)#ospfv3 1 ipv4 area 0
  • C: Router(config-router)#ospfv3 3 1
  • D: Router# ospfv3 1 address-family ipv4 unicast

Correct Answer: B

The newest OSPFv3 configuration approach utilizes a single OSPFv3 process. It is capable of supporting IPv4 and IPv6 within a single OSPFv3 process. 
OSPFv3 builds a single database with LSAs that carry IPv4 and IPv6 information. The OSPF adjacencies are established separately for each address family. 
Settings that are specific to an address family (IPv4/IPv6) are configured inside that address family router configuration mode. 
Running single OSPFv3 for both IPv4 and IPv6 is supported since Cisco IOS Software Release 15.1(3)S. 
The new-style OSPFv3 process is enabled using the router ospfv3 process-number command. 
Within the OSPF process configuration mode, the OSPF process ID is defined (using the router-id ospf-process-ID command). 
OSPFv3 New-Style OSPF Configuration Commands:
R1(config)#ipv6 unicast-routing //although only OSPFv3 for IPv4 is configured but we have to enable IPv6 under global configuration mode 
R1(config)#router ospfv3 1 
R1(config-router)# router-id 1.1.1.1 
R1(config)#interface GigabitEthernet0/1 
R1(config-if)#ipv6 enable //although only OSPFv3 for IPv4 is configured but we have to enable IPv6 under interface mode 
R1(config-if)#ospfv3 1 ipv4 area 0 
Therefore answer B is the best answer here but in this answer, the configuration mode is not correct. It should be interface mode (config-if)#, not router mode (config-router)#. Reference: https://www.ciscopress.com/articles/article.asp?p=2294214&seqNum=4




Question 2

Refer to the exhibit. 
User in the branch network of 2001:db8:0:4 report they cannot access the internet. 
Which command is issued in IPv6 router EIGRP 100 configuration mode to solve this issue?

      

R1#show ipv6 eigrp topology Branch#show ipv6 eigrp topology EIGRP-IPv6 Topology Table for EIGRP-IPv6 Topology Table for AS(100)/ID(10.1.12.1) AS(100)/ID(4.4.4.4) 
Passive, A  Active, U  Update, Q  Passive, A  Active, U  Update, Q Codes: P Codes: 
P Query, R  Rely,  Query, R  Rely, reply Status, s  sia Status  reply Status, s  sia Status r r 
P 2001:DB8:0:4::/64, 1 successors, FD is P 2001:DB8:0:4::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2816 28416 via Connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
via FE80::C828:DFF:FEF4:1C (28416/2816), P 2001:DB8:0:1::/64, 1 successors, FD is FastEthernet3/0 28416
P 2001:DB8:0:1::/64, 1 successors, FD is 2816 via FE80:C820:17FF:FE04:54 (28416/2816), via Connected, GigabitEthernet0/0 FastEthernet1/0
P ::/0, 1 successors, FD is 2816 P 2001:DB8:0:14::/64, 1 successors, FD is via FE80::C821:17FF:FE04:8 (2816/256), 28160
GigabitEthernet1/0 via Connected, FastEthernet1/0 
P 2001:DB8:0:14::/64, 1 successors, FD is P 2001:DB8:0:12::/64, 1 successors, FD is 28160 28416 via Connected, FastEthernet3/0 via FE80:C820:17FF:FE04:54 (28416/2816), P 2001:DB8:0:12::/64, 1 successors, FD is FastEthernet1/0 via Connected, GigabitEthernet0/0

  • A: Issue the eigrp stub command on R1
  • B: Issue the no neighbor stub command on R1
  • C: Issue the eigrp stub command on R2
  • D: Issue the no eigrp stub command on R2

Correct Answer: B

In the output of R1, we see R1 has a default route to the Internet via G1/0, which is correct but R2 does not have this route. One reasonable answer of this issue is R1 has been configured as a stub router so it only advertised connected and summary routes. In Branch router output, we also see routes that are directly connected to R1 only. 
Note: In this topology, only Branch router should be configured as stub, not R1 router.




Question 3

An engineer configuration a static route on a router, but when the engineer checks the route to the destination, a different next hop is chosen. 
What is the reason for this? 
Router#show running-config | include ip route ip route 192.168.2.2 255.255.255.255 209.165.200.225 130 Router#show ip route 
---output omitted--- 
Gateway of last resort is not set 
192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 
C 192.168.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0 
192.168.2.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 
O 192.168.2.2 [110/11] via 192.168.12.2,00:33:32, Ethernet0/0 192.168.12.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks C 192.168.12.0/24 is directly connected, Ethernet0/0 L 192.168.12.1/32 is directly connected, Ethernet0/0 209.165.200.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks C 209.165.200.0/24 is directly connected, Ethernet0/1 209.165.200.226/32 is directly connected, Ethernet0/1

  • A: The configured AD for the static route is higher than the AD of OSPF
  • B: The metric of the OSPF route is lower than the metric of the static route
  • C: Dynamic routing protocol always have priority over static routes
  • D: The syntax of the static route is not valid do the route is not considered

Correct Answer: A

The AD of static route is manually configured to 130 which is higher than the AD of OSPF router which is 110.




Question 4

An engineer is trying to generate a summary route in OSPF for network 10.0.0.0/8, but the summary route does not show up in the routing table. 
Why is the summary route missing? 
Router#show ip route 
Gateway of last resort is not set 
192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 
O 192.168.1.1[110/11] via 192.168.12.1,13:32:22, Ethernet0/0 192.168.2.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks C 192.168.2.0/24 is directly connected, Loopback0
L 192.168.2.2/32 is directly connected, Loopback0 
192.168.3.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks C 192.168.3.0/24 is directly connected, Ethernet0/1 L 192.168.3.1/32 is directly connected, Ethernet0/1 192.168.12.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks C 192.168.12.0/24 is directly connected, Ethernet0/0 L 192.168.12.2/32 is directly connected, Ethernet0/0 Router#show running-config | section ospf 
router ospf 1 
summary-address 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 
redistribute static subnets 
network 192.168.3.0 0.0.0. 255 area 0 
network 192.168.12.0 0.0.0. 255 area 0 
Router#

  • A: The summary route is not visible on this router, but it is visible on other OSPF routers in the same area
  • B: The summary-address command is used only for summary prefixes between areas
  • C: The summary route is visible only in the OSPF database not in the routing table
  • D: There is no route for a subnet inside 10.0.0.0/8, so the summary route is not generated

Correct Answer: D

The summary-address is only used to create aggregate addresses for OSPF at an autonomous system boundary. 
It means this command should only be used on the ASBR when you are trying to summarize externally redistributed routes from another protocol domain or you have a NSSA area. 
But a requirement to create a summarized route is:
The ASBR compares the summary route's range of addresses with all routes redistributed into OSPF on that ASBR to find any subordinate subnets 
(subnets that sit inside the summary route range). If at least one subordinate subnet exists, the ASBR advertises the summary route. 
Reference: CCNP Route 642-902 Official Certification Guide
But in this case we found no prefix that belongs to 10.0.0.0/8. Therefore a summarized route for this subnet could not be created. 
Note:
If a prefix of this subnet exists in the routing table then after the summarization is performed, we will see such an entry:
Router# show ip route 
-- output omitted -- 
0 10.0.0.0/8 is a summary via null0 
An example of using the command summary-address is shown below:

      

Recently the RIPv2 domain has been redistributed into our OSPF domain but the administrator wants to configure a summarized route instead of 32 external type-5 LSAs (for 172.16.32.0/24 to 172.16.63.0/24) flooding into the OSPF network. 
In this case the administrator has to use the summary-address command as follows:
Router(config-router)#summary-address 172.16.32.0 255.255.224.0 
Note: In this case R1 is the ASBR for OSPF domain.
BGP Questions 
https://www.networktut.com/bgp-questions




Question 5

R2 is a route reflector, and R1 and R3 are route reflector clients. The router R2 learns the route to 172.16.25.0/24 from R1, but it does not advertise to R3. 
What is the reason the route is not advertised? 
R2#show ip bgp 
BGP table version is 4, local router ID is 209.65.200.225 Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, > best, i - internal,r RIB-failure, S Stale 
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete
RPKI validation codes: V valid, I invalid, N Not found
Network Next Hop Metric LocPrf Weight Path 
* i 172.16.25.0/24 209.165.200.225 0 100 0 ? 
R3#show ip bgp summary 
BGP router identifier 192.168.3.3, local AS number 65000 BGP table version is 4, main routing table version 4 
Neighbor V AS MsgRcvd MsgSent TblVer InQ OutQ Up/Down State/PfxRcd 
192.168.2.2 4 65000 8 7 4 0 0 01:00:18 0

  • A: Route reflector setup requires full BGP mesh between the routers
  • B: In route reflector setup only classification prefix are advertised from one client to another
  • C: In route reflector setup only classful prefix are advertised to other clients
  • D: R2 does not have a route to the next hop, so R2 does not advertise the prefix to the clients

Correct Answer: D

With route reflector (RR), we only need to establish a BGP session from the RR to each internal peer -> Answer A is not correct. 
We can advertise both classful and classless prefix to other clients, provided that the prefix satisfies the RR forwarding rules -> Answer B and answer C are not correct. 
Therefore only answer D is left. Maybe we are missing an IGP in our topology so R2 did not know how to reach the next hop reported by the prefix.




Question 6

Which control plan policy limits BGP traffic that is destined to the CPU to 1 Mbps and ignores BGP traffic that is higher rate? 
Cat3850-Stack-2#show policy-map 
Policy Map LIMIT_BGP 
Class BGP 
drop 
Policy Map LIMIT_BGP 
Class BGP 
Average Rate Traffic Shaping 
cir 10000000 (bps) 
Policy Map POLICY_BGP 
Class BGP 
police cir 1000k bc 1500 
conform-action transmit 
exceed-action transmit 
Policy Map COPP 
Class BGP 
police cir 1000k bc 1500 
conform-action transmit 
exceed-action drop

  • A: policy-map SHAPE_BGP
  • B: policy-map LIMIT_BGP
  • C: policy-map POLICE_BGP
  • D: policy-map COPP

Correct Answer: D

The conform-action specifies the action to take on packets that conform to the rate limit and the exceed-action specifies the action to be taken on packets when the packet rate is greater than the rate specified in the maximum-burst-bytes argument.




Question 7

Refer to the exhibit.

    

A router receiving BGP routing updates from multiple neighbors for routers in AS 690.
What is the reason that the router still sends traffic that is destined to AS 690 to a neighbor other than 10.222.10.1?

  • A: The local preference value in another neighbor statement is higher than 250
  • B: The local preference value should be set to the same value as the weight in the route map
  • C: The route map is applied in the wrong direction
  • D: The weight value in another statement is higher than 200

Correct Answer: C




Question 8

What is the result if applying this configuration? R1#show policy-map control-plane 
Control Plane 
Service-policy input: CoPP-BGP
Class-map: BGP (match-all)
2716 packets, 193843 bytes 
5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps Match: access-group name BGPdrop 
Class-map: class-default (match-any)
5212 packets, 64484847 bytes 
5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps Match: any

  • A: The router can form BGP neighborships with any other device.
  • B: The router can form BGP neighborships with any device that matched by the access list named BGP
  • C: The router cannot form BGP neighborships with any other device
  • D: The router cannot form BGP neighborships with any device that is matched by the access list named BGP

Correct Answer: D




Question 9

in which circumstance does the BGP neighbor remain in the idle condition? 
R200#show ip bgp summary 
BGP router identifier 10.1.1.1, local AS number 65000 BGP table version is 26, main routing table version 26 1 network entries using 132 bytes of memory 
1 path entries using 52 bytes of memory 
2/1 BGP path/bestpath attribute entries using 296 bytes of memory 0 BGP route-map cache entries using 0 bytes of memory 0 BGP filter-list cache entries using 0 bytes of memory Bitfield cache entries: current 1 (at peak 2) using 28 bytes of memory BGP using 508 total bytes of memory BGP activity 24/23 prefixes, 24/23 paths, scan interval 60 secs Neighbor V AS MsgRcvd MsgSent TblVer InQ OutQ Up/Down State/PfxRcd 192.0.2.2 4 65100 20335 20329 0 0 0 00:02:04 Idle(PfxCt)R200#

  • A: if prefixes are not received from the BGP peer
  • B: if prefixes reach the maximum limit
  • C: if a prefix list is applied on the inbound direction
  • D: if prefixes exceed the maximum limit

Correct Answer: D

Idle (PfxCt) means the session is in the Idle state because the neighbor has sent more prefixes than the configured maximum-prefixes limit. 
router bgp 100 
neighbor 10.0.0.1 remote-as 200 
neighbor 10.0.0.1 maximum-prefix 10 80 
In the last command, 10 is the maximum number of prefixes allowed from the neighbor and the router starts to generate a warning message at 80%. 
Reference: 
https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/docs/ip/border-gateway-protocol-bgp/25160- bgp-maximum-prefix.html
Therefore if the BGP neighbor sent 11 prefixes, the local router will be in Idle (PfxCt) state. 
Route-map Questions 
https://www.networktut.com/route-map-questions




Question 10

R2 has a locally originated prefix 192.168.130.0/24 and has these configurations:
ip prefix-list test seq 5 permit 192.168.130.0/24 
route-map OUT permit 10 
match ip address prefix-list test 
set as-path prepend 65000 
What is the result when the route-map OUT command is applied toward an eBGP neighbor R1 (1.1.1.1) by using the neighbor 1.1.1.1 route-map OUT out command?

  • A: R1 sees 192.168.130.0/24 as two hops away instead of one AS hop away
  • B: R1 does not forward traffic that is destined for 192.168.130.0/24
  • C: Network 192.168.130.0/24 is not allowed in the R1 table
  • D: R1 does not accept any route other than 192.168.130.0/24

Correct Answer: A

AS-Path prepending is a way to manipulate the AS-Path attribute of a BGP route. It allows prepending multiple entries of AS to a BGP route.










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